Be The Naturalist! Or: Sorry, Your Mum Is Not a Valid Test Participant

Michael Rawling

Half-day workshop - in English

Speaking to the right users and getting more than feature requests

 

"If you want understand how a Lions hunts, don’t go to the Zoo, go to the Savannah."

 

User Research is one of the cornerstones of UX but the sheer volume of techniques around, combined with jargon and ‘silo’d teams often means the fundamental goal of many approaches like UX and XP always seems beyond reach:

 - To bring together (understanding of) the people who use a system with those who actually create it.


Mike Rawling, a ux veteran of products and projects of all sizes and shapes, takes attendees on a safari through the world of user research techniques, combining tried and tested formal UX experiences with the latest practical techniques, hot from the ux trenches you can use as a team. These include methods for user interviews, agile ethnography, user observation and practically testing your ideas with users in a measured way that fits right into the world of digital design and development: without compromising either UX or your XP, Agile, Lean or other development principles. 

Those new to UX, new to user research or struggling with getting good feedback will come away from this session with an introduction to using the right types of user research in your Agile/Lean/XP process so they serve as an invaluable source of intelligence for you, your team and stakeholders, whilst most UX practitioners will come away with techniques that can help them solve the conundrum of ensuring rigorous user research in a rapidly changing landscape of disrupted devices, platforms and markets.

 

 

 

                                                                                                      

Primarily for: Developers, Tester/test leads, Project managers, Architects, UX specialists, Product developers, Managers, Agile coaches, Designers, Others

Participant requirements: Notepads. Laptops if they have integral video conferencing cameras are welcomed but it's not necessary.